Hair Timeline: The Beginnings

Here’s what tipped the curiosity into dyeing my hair in different colors. As an asian, I have naturally black hair — Jet Black may be the right term —

I just remembered how when I was little and saw my mom applying some Black stuff (which is a cheap tinting dye from China that is common in the Philippines) because her white hair is showing up due to age, I insisted she tint my hair too — remember that I was a kid, around nine (9) years old — and she did; and after that, at times when she does it on her hair, she does mine, too.

I really have no idea about hair dyes, colors, application, the chemicals, etc. the first time I did it. I’ve just been looking up on the internet on how to “lighten” my hair and with a very little research and impatience, I ended up purchasing Dariya Palty Hairdye in Mecha Flash Bleach Sparkling Blonde from an online shop selling Japanese products based in the Philippines.

Dariya Palty Hairdye in Mecha Flash Bleach Sparkling Blonde – Front Packaging
Dariya Palty Hairdye in Mecha Flash Bleach Sparkling Blonde – Rear-side Packaging

This was way back April of 2011. I did not took a photo of it, as I do not have all the resources during that time, but I remembered quite well how it worked for me. (Well, goodbye, virgin hair!)

*Update as of February 2019:
They have re-branded the Bleach lineup. Check it here.

THOUGHTS ON PALTY SPARKLING BLONDE:

The box contains the bleaching powder sachet, developer, conditioning shampoo (or hair treatment formulated by Dariya,) instructions/manual (which is in Japanese characters,) plastic bottle, screw-type comb-like plastic, and plastic disposable gloves.

Sparkling Blonde Bleaching Kit contents – Photo c/o Google Images

I followed the instructions which is in Japanese – Hiragana & Katakana characters – but you can surely comprehend and follow the illustrations, anyway.

Mix up the bleach powder and developer cream (tube) well inside the provided plastic bottle, then attach the plastic comb at the mouth of the bottle. Put on your gloves. Apply to your hair as evenly as possible. I left it for about 40 minutes. Washed with shampoo, then the small packet of conditioner or after-dye hair treatment.

It did lighten my hair, NOT sparkling blonde light, but halfway there. It left my hair undamaged. Quite soft afterwards, actually.

My hair color, April 2011 / Abu Dhabi, UAE
April 2011 / Abu Dhabi, UAE

It is claimed to be made for teenagers; or their target market are girls like me, aged 16 at that time. It does not smell bad — or strong, like your usual hair dyes that stings. It does not leave your hair damaged!

P.S. I bleached my hair a few days before our flight to UAE, and knowing that it’s the Middle East during summer, it’s extremely hot. Direct exposure to sunlight, aside from damaging your hair and skin, may cause the fading of the color right away, so my mother bought me a L’oreal Shampoo and Conditioner for colored hair (which is quite funny because she was against the act of my bleaching my hair,) that was supposed to help in maintaining the color of my hair until I went back to the Philippines. I think it barely did a thing.

That’s it for my first time. Mind telling me your history?

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One thought on “Hair Timeline: The Beginnings

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